How are moving estimates calculated?

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TexasTee
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2016 8:17 am

How are moving estimates calculated?

Postby TexasTee » Fri Apr 01, 2016 8:20 am

We are moving from Chicago to Boise Idaho.

Based on a walk-through with local United affiliate (Corrigan), we have 6939 lbs. and 1028 cu ft. with move estimate at $4706. Using a straight calculation, each cu foot costs $4.58 to move. So a 40 cu ft sofa would cost $183 to move. Do you know if this is how estimates are calculated?

I'm asking because the rep strongly encouraged me to keep an old, beat up sofa and let him move it, rather than leave it here and buy a new sofa at the destination. His verbal cost to move it was $100 rather than $183.

Logically, it seems ridiculous to pay anyone to move a piece of furniture that you'd prefer to replace anyway. Unless there is some mathematical equation involving science, physics, and the rotation of the earth that is involved in his calculation??

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Jeff.Walker
Posts: 1189
Joined: Fri Aug 28, 2009 10:32 am
Location: Central IL

Re: How are moving estimates calculated?

Postby Jeff.Walker » Sun Apr 03, 2016 5:08 pm

We always recommend you get quotes by the pound, not cubic feet. The only recourse you have for being additional charges is your weight tickets. You have the right to be present at the weighing of the truck, before and after your goods were placed on the truck at the destination and the point of origin.

Taking all this into consideration, you should expect to pay about $1/lb. So, if your mover quoted you $4,706 for 6939 lbs, it’s a real bargain. Tell them to translate that into lbs, then put it in writing. As for the sofa, don’t let them talk you into moving anything you feel you can replace at the destination. Why use that money to move when you can use it toward something new at the other end? If your sofa was new, or in good condition, that might be another story. Ultimately the choice is yours, but I'd say go with your gut on this one.

Hope this helps!

TexasTee
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2016 8:17 am

Re: How are moving estimates calculated?

Postby TexasTee » Mon Apr 04, 2016 8:35 am

Yes, thank you. It does help. :D

One final question: Are you familiar with United's "Straight Talk Assurance". Corrigan rep from Hanover Park, with best estimate of $4700, says that this option saves me money because it is not based on weight. It is a "binding estimate" that doesn't change unless we add to the inventory. He did do an onsite walk-through.

Does anyone have previous experience with this "Straight Talk" option?

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Jeff.Walker
Posts: 1189
Joined: Fri Aug 28, 2009 10:32 am
Location: Central IL

Re: How are moving estimates calculated?

Postby Jeff.Walker » Mon Apr 04, 2016 7:22 pm

Chris Noblit has been a volunteer in the past and does a pretty good job of explaining it here:

http://www.avatar-moving.com/forum/foru ... d=200&pn=1

NYCMover
Posts: 577
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2009 4:35 pm
Location: New York, NY

Re: How are moving estimates calculated?

Postby NYCMover » Mon Apr 11, 2016 10:24 pm

All domestic United Van Lines estimates are based on weight. Our tariffs are not designed for calculations by the cubic foot.

It is possible the Corrigan rep meant that each piece has a cubic footage associated with that converts to "nn" pounds. The usual conversion factor is 7 lbs. per cubic foot (sometimes 6.75 lbs. per cubic foot) for normal household goods - so a 40 cubic foot sofa is hitting the shipment weight at about 280 lbs.

Please be advised that the costs of shipping household goods per pound is not a linear scale - as the shipment weight goes down, the price per pound goes up; the converse is also true - as shipment weight increases price per pound decreases with major changes happening at certain weight thresholds as set by the tariff. For instance if your weight is set at 6,150 lbs. and you deduct 150 lbs. you might only see a change in shipment price of a few dollars. The price might only change radically if you reduce the inventory to put the shipment into a lower or higher weight band (class.)

The Corrigan rep probably meant that the bound quote you received is pegged to a certain weight which was derived by the calculated weight for all items listed on the inventory. The rep is saying that as long as you don't add to the inventory your price will not change (and that is because the weight would not change.) On a straight bound quote, the driver is not even required to weigh the truck before and after the shipment is picked up, unless he/she challenged the shipment weight before anything was loaded or inventoried.

Also, the rep is trying to tell you that you can move the sofa for very little money. Whether you want the piece of furniture or not is up to you, but the suggestion is that where else are you going to get a sofa for that little money?

Good luck with your move! :)

anothermover
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 1:36 pm

Re: How are moving estimates calculated?

Postby anothermover » Wed Sep 21, 2016 1:41 pm

For an interstate move your charges will be primarily based on materials used and weight.

Focus on getting a baseline discount of at least 60% and free full value protection (6$ per pound valuation), as a United Agent they should have it if you pry.


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